getty_rf_photo_man_woman_lifting_weights

Bodybuilding Can Help You Manage Rheumatoid Arthritis!

Bodybuilding can help prevent some diseases (sarcopenia and osteoporosis to name a few) and help manage the symptoms in other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.
Article Summary:

  • RA is a condition where the immune system attacks healthy joint tissue.
  • There isn’t much that can be done to actively prevent RA.
  • While there is no cure, training and diet can slow it’s progression.

A bodybuilder is someone who takes better care of himself/herself through cardiovascular training, resistance training, eating a good diet and taking dietary supplements. This is someone who is engaging in preventive health measures to ensure they live a long, healthy life and minimize their risk of developing various chronic diseases.

Bodybuilding can help prevent some diseases (sarcopenia and osteoporosis to name a few) and help manage the symptoms in other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.


What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease that causes inflammation of the thin layer of tissue, which lines the space between joints (called the synovium). Symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis typically include pain, fatigue and joint stiffness. This is a serious disease that can result in long-term damage to the joints, chronic pain, decreased functioning and disability.

This Is A Serious Disease That Can Result In Long-Term Damage To The Joints. This Is A Serious Disease That Can
Result In Long-Term Damage To The Joints.

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is systemic, meaning it can affect other organs of the body. There is no cure for RA but an early diagnosis and aggressive treatment plan is essential for limiting joint damage and the ensuing issues that arise from joint damage (loss of movement, decreased ability to work, medical expenses and potential surgery).

Must Read:  A Day in the Life of Someone With Rheumatoid Arthritis


Risk Factors

      Though the exact cause of RA is unknown, it is considered an autoimmune disease because the immune system mistakes healthy tissue as a foreign substance and attacks it.

      • Women are two to three times as likely as men to get RA
      • In the year after pregnancy women are more likely to develop RA
      • Genetics may play a role in the development of RA with Caucasians carrying the gene more than any other ethnicity (though just carrying the gene alone does not mean that you will develop RA)

There isn’t much, if anything, that you can do to prevent the onset of RA. However, you can manage the disease to the best extent possible and live a better life.


Bodybuilding Can Help You Manage Rheumatoid Arthritis

      There is no cure for RA but you can manage the symptoms. Here are some of the recommendations that come with managing this disease:

Exercise:

        Prolonged joint inactivity makes the symptoms of RA worse. People with RA benefit from moving to maintain their muscle strength, flexibility and health. And, exercise can help reduce the pain and improve mobility and functioning as well.

Stretching

        ,

strengthening

      and conditioning are recommended for RA patients.
Prolonged Joint Inactivity Makes The Symptoms Of RA Worse.
Prolonged Joint Inactivity Makes
The Symptoms Of RA Worse.
        As a bodybuilder, you know how important

strength training

        is for your physical and mental health. Studies show that strength training can improve or maintain the quality of life in those with RA. And, people with RA have an increased risk of developing osteoporosis – a disease that a good sound bodybuilding program can help prevent.
Must Read:  Home Remedies For Rheumatoid Arthritis

Eat A Balanced Diet:

        A good diet, low in saturated fat and cholesterol and high in fiber, fruits and vegetables is recommended for those with RA.

In fact, diet is very important for a few reasons – RA increases your risk of developing osteoporosis and heart disease. And, a sound diet can reduce inflammation, which will help decrease the symptoms associated with RA.

 

Leave a Reply

Name *
Email *
Website