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My daughter died from a kiss: Mother of Montreal woman, 20, who died from allergic shock after smooching peanut-eating boyfriend wants others to learn from her tragic fate

  • Myriam Ducre-Lemay, 20, died from an allergic reaction to peanuts in 2012
  • Her new boyfriend kissed after eating peanuts, unaware of her allergies
  • The young Montreal woman did not carry her epipen, her mother says
  • Mother is now speaking out to raise awareness of the dangers of allergies 
Myriam Ducre-Lemay, 20, died from an allergic reaction to peanuts in 2012

Myriam Ducre-Lemay, 20, died from an allergic reaction to peanuts in 2012

A Montreal mother says her daughter died after kissing her new boyfriend, who wasn’t aware she had a severe peanut allergy.

Myriam Ducre-Lemay, 20, had recently met the boy when she went to his house to spend the night after a party in 2012, her mother said.

After the boyfriend ate a peanut butter sandwich for a late-night snack, he returned to the bedroom and gave Myriam the fatal kiss, the mother, Micheline Ducre, told the Journal De Quebec on Wednesday.

The boy did not tell her he had eaten peanuts, and he wasn’t aware of her life-threatening allergy.

‘Unfortunately, she wouldn’t have had the time to tell him she had a peanut allergy,’ the mother said.

After realizing Myriam was having an allergic shock, the young couple called 911. Paramedics arrived within minutes and transported her to hospital, but the young woman’s life could not be saved.

The mother said Myriam had told her only days earlier that she was in love.

‘It’s the first time I saw my daughter with such bright eyes,’ Micheline Ducre told the newspaper.

Myriam Ducre-Lemay’s mother said she suffered the allergic reaction after kissing her new boyfriend, who had eaten peanut butter and wasn’t aware of her severe allergy

Myriam Ducre-Lemay did not carry her epipen on the night of her death, and did not inform her boyfriend of her peanut allergy, her mother said 

Myriam Ducre-Lemay did not carry her epipen on the night of her death, and did not inform her boyfriend of her peanut allergy, her mother said

Micheline Ducre's daughter died from an allergic reaction in 2012. Now she is telling her story to raise awareness

Micheline Ducre’s daughter died from an allergic reaction in 2012. Now she is telling her story to raise awareness

Now, she is telling her daughter’s story for the first time in the hopes of raising awareness of the dangers of allergies. She also hopes that people at risk will carry epipens with them at all times.

Myriam did not carry her epipen – an epinephrine autoinjector that is used to treat serious allergic reactions – on the night that she died, her mother said.

A doctor who spoke with CTV Montreal said traces of allergens can stay in a person’s saliva for up to four hours after eating.

‘This is why you have to carry your epipen, even though you don’t want to and even though it’s not cool,’ said Dr. Christine McCusker, head of pediatric allergy and immunology at Montreal Children’s Hospital

‘The most important part of managing your allergies is that you have to inform people. You have to say, “Listen guys, I have food allergies. I have my epipen. If there is a problem, help me,’ McCusker said.

In 2005, there was another reported case in Montreal of a young woman who died from an allergic reaction after kissing a boy.

Must Read:  Top 5 Kitchen Dos and Don’ts for Food Allergies Safety

But a coroner’s report subsequently revealed that 15-year-old Christina Desforges died from an asthma attack, not an allergic reaction, theAssociated Press reported.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3632491/Mother-Myriam-Ducre-Lemay-20-died-allergic-shock-smooching-peanut-eating-boyfriend-wants-learn-tragic-fate.html#ixzz4FZPvho8s
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